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Volunteering at Heartland Farm Sanctuary

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Nov. 6, 2013

In this week's Badger Blog, senior Mary Massei writes about the team's trip to Heartland Farm Sanctuary and impact volunteering has on the team and the community. 

This past weekend our Badger softball team had the opportunity to volunteer at Heartland Farm Sanctuary, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping homeless farm animals in Wisconsin. Heartland also reaches out to the youth and works with young adults with disabilities. Their farm allows the youth to get away from their every day lives and assist in doing barn chores. 
As a program, we thought it would be a great idea to take just a couple hours out of our Saturday afternoon to help prepare this organization for the winter months.  By working together as a team, we helped clean up the barn, interact with the animals and build multiple chicken coops. Usually when you see the softball team covered in dirt it's from stealing bases but this time it was from putting hard work into manual labor helping out a good cause within the community. 
Volunteering at Heartland showed me more than that we can handle tools, but it showed me that our program is capable of doing big things when we all invest and join together. For some of the girls it was their first time even stepping foot on a farm, but when assigned a task, everyone put all of their effort into it. We may have been out of our element and had to deal with some adversity, but that didn't stop us from seizing the moment and getting the job done. 
When I see the team working hard doing volunteer work together, it reminds me of how blessed we are to be a part of this program. It may be just a couple hours out of our Saturday afternoons, but our services truly impact the community and organizations we help out. 

The road to the World Series starts here

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In today's Badger Blog, head coach Yvette Healy writes about the importance of the off-season. 

We just finished our fall season, winning two games against UW Parkside. It's been a beautiful fall in Madison. Softball is switching gears and starting individual workouts this week. Instead of practicing 20 hours a week, we drop down to six hours of lifting and conditioning and two hours of skill instruction. This is the critical part in the season, when the hardest working kids with the most passion can really improve. 

Below are a few notes from our chalk talk with our team, preparing them for our winter workouts. 

The road to the World Series starts here:

"You may not be able to do great things, but you can do small things with great love"-Mother Teresa

What's you plan for the fall? You have about 15 weeks, or 100 days until opening day at South Florida when we match up with No. 25 South Florida and No. 5 Florida on day one. How are you going to get to where you need to be as an individual? How are you going to get to where you need to be, to help the team? That's the bigger question. This isn't about you, and what you can and can't do, or what you're willing or unwilling to do, it's about your team. It's about the team needing you, and your special skills and talents. You were brought here for a reason. You've been given this amazing opportunity to be a Badger for a purpose. Are you too busy with school, your social life, and personal problems to give the team the focus and attention it deserves? Are you too busy to train?

"Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe"- Abraham Lincoln

Are you passionately committed to this softball program? Are you the best player you can be right now? Games are not won or lost in February or May, they are won in October, November and December. You can't show up on game day and get a few extra swings off the small ball machine to magically hit better that day. You can't run a few extra sprints before the game and think you'll steal more bases today. You have to put the work in now, six days a week, every morning, from October through May to have the honor of playing in June. Championships are won and lost at 6 a.m., when most people sleep and someone wakes up to train. 

The questions you have to ask yourselves are these; Are you in the best shape of your life? Do you have great speed, agility, and endurance? Are you strong? How's your hitting? Can you handle both sides of the plate? Can you hit change-ups? Do you understand and know the strike zone? Can you sacrifice or squeeze in any count? Do you have a great first step on defense? Do you take great angles? How's your transition? How's your arm strength? Are you confident with your backhand? Do you know your base coverage, bunt, slap and steal responsibilities? Can you run down balls over your head? Do you come through balls consistently and field the short hop? Can you pick balls at bases for forces and tag plays? Will you sacrifice your body to stop a bad throw?  Can you dive and catch line drives and pop ups? How's your jump stealing? Do you accelerate into your slide? Can you slide head first?  Can you hit your spots pitching? Do you have an effective first pitch, change up, and strike out pitch to both righties and lefties?

You need a specific plan to fix your deficiencies. You have to collaborate with your coaches, trainers and strength staff to work smart and work efficiently. Your team needs you. Create a calendar, come up with a plan, use the new indoor facility, and commit yourself to the teams' success.  You have a little more than 100 days to prepare for the best season of your life.

Performance under pressure


Thumbnail image for Rins.JPGIn today's Badger Blog, head coach Yvette Healy writes about the beautiful fall weather, championship rings and the new schedule. 

It's a beautiful fall in Madison. The leaves are changing colors, and the weather is gorgeous, with temperatures in the 70's. We got in four great games in last weekend against Illinois State and Northern Illinois. Our stands were packed with family and friends as we handed out our Big Ten championship rings to the 2013 team. 

Coming off of such a memorable season, it was fun to take the time to appreciate what a great run we had. Our sport is so challenging, that you're always on to the next thing. You continue to raise your expectations, raise your goals and increase the challenges you take on. After playing this fall, it's apparent that we've lost a lot of great players through graduation. We had some tremendous pitching and offense in that senior class. It's important as a team that we really study the past to understand how we achieved, and why. 

Wisconsin softball is still a growing, up-and-coming program. It was fun to break into the top 25 last year, but we still have a long way to go to become a top-10 team. We've been blessed with a great group of student-athletes that are emotionally invested, who love this sport and their teammates, and work extremely hard. I'd take passion and work-ethic any day over complacent talent. This year will certainly be the same. As we look ahead to our spring schedule, we have more games against top 10 and top 25 teams than ever before. It's going to take a lot of selfless leadership to prepare for this kind of challenge. 

Our focus this season is on selfless mental toughness. We're excited to see our team match up against the top talent in the country early on, so we can learn, grow, face adversity and get better. Our staff is committed to creativity. We're studying ourselves, the game and our opponents, to pick up 100 ways that we can get better, through strategy, drills and execution. 

We're fascinated right now with the social side of athletics. How do we get our kids peaking at the right time? How can we put them in the best position to succeed, statistically? How do we create momentum on our side, and stress for our opponents? Our team activities, drill work and chalk talks are focusing on physical performance under pressure, mental toughness in the face of adversity and skills and drills that prepare our team to play with the best competition in the country.

Badger Blog: Hall of Fame week

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In today's Badger Blog, head coach Yvette Healy writes about the start of a new school year and Andrea Kirchberg's induction into the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame.  

Welcome back Badger softball fans. We are thrilled to have everyone back on campus and to kick-off the 2013-14 season. This first week of classes has been filled with activities, events and inspiration in Madison. We'll try to share some stories and photos from our exciting first week.

On August 30, Andrea Kirchberg became the first Badger softball student-athlete inducted into the Wisconsin Athletics Hall of Fame. In her amazing career, Andrea set numerous school records for wins (87), strikeouts (1156) and more, while leading her team to back-to-back NCAA tournament appearances in 2001 and 2002.

Our entire team attended the Hall of Fame reception. We were so inspired, hearing about Andrea's determination, grit and legacy. She's faced a great deal of personal adversity throughout her life, and those challenges have never stopped Andrea from achieving unseen heights in athletic accomplishments. 

We were all touched when one of Andrea's teammates, Boo Gillette shared a few stories about what Andrea meant to her as a leader in the Badger softball program.  

"Andrea was one of the first ones to take me under her wing and show me campus and a FUN time! She always made sure I was taken care of at practice and not pushed around by the upper classmen. She was the one who made me realize that I could be a true leader as a freshman and win a starting spot.
 
Andrea was a work horse for the team. We always knew if she was on the mound; we had a shot to win. She threw the majority of the innings while she was there and never complained. She pitched through broken ribs, an injured forearm and many other soreness issues from over use. She was very fit and pushed herself to always be stronger in the weight room.

Andrea had a really hard childhood. She never used that as an excuse. She used it as a motivating factor. She is one tough cookie! I love Andrea Kirchberg ... and always will. She is the type of friend that you can go months or years without talking to and when you see her, it is as if you were with her the day before. She was such a stud on the mound and such a loyal friend in life. Andrea truly has it all: beauty, smarts, athletic ability and a kind heart. I am so proud of Andrea for being inducted into the Hall of Fame. She is by far the greatest pitcher in Wisconsin softball history and no one is more deserving of this honor."

Watching Andrea get inducted into the Hall of Fame, and seeing how current and former Badger softball athletes responded to the event was really inspirational. It's always incredible to meet someone who changes the course of history and the trajectory of a program. Andrea helped put Wisconsin softball on the map and her records still stand today. Her ability to battle adversity with grace and courage is incredible. Even now, you can sense her competitiveness and drive. She's such a strong role model for our Wisconsin softball family. We're all blessed for having the opportunity to hear her story and share in the pride and accomplishments she's brought to the Badger softball program. 

Achievements of the Year: Darrah named Big Ten tournament MVP

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Over the course of two weeks, UW Athletics will look back on the Badgers' biggest accomplishments during the 2012-13 season.

Twenty-one innings of work in the circle and a Big Ten tournament title capped of a record setting weekend for Badgers' pitcher Cassandra Darrah. Darrah led Wisconsin to its first ever Big Ten tournament championship and solidified the team's first NCAA tournament bid since 2005. 

Darrah earned Big Ten tournament MVP accolades after earning a 3-0 record in the tournament and recording a 1.67 ERA. In the title game against Minnesota, Darrah pitched a gem, allowing only two hits while striking out eight.

A first-team All-Big Ten and a second-team NFCA Great Lakes All-Region honoree, Darrah finished the season with a UW single-season record .791 winning percentage while earning a 27-7 ledger. Her 27 victories were second in school history, and her 231.1 innings pitched were the fifth-most in a single season at Wisconsin. Darrah tossed 27 complete games in 2013, which ranks fourth in school history, and her nine Big Ten wins ranks second all-time at UW. 

Darrah, a native of Corydon, Iowa, earned Big Ten Pitcher of the Week twice this season, and tossed UW's first no-hitter in 12 seasons. She pitched a complete game shutout in Wisconsin's 8-0 win over No. 16 Stanford, and tossed a complete game in a triumph over No. 6 Michigan. She tied a career-high with 10 strikeouts in a 6-4 win over Notre Dame. Darrah also earned UW's Defensive Player of the Year for the second time in her career. 

In only her third year, Darrah is tied for second in program history with 65 career victories, and her 2.17 career ERA ranks second. Her .684 winning percentage is the best in UW history, and her 19 shutouts rank second. Darrah has punched out 424 batters in her career, which is Wisconsin's sixth-best mark, and her 67 complete games rank third all-time.

Achievements of the Year: Softball team wins Big Ten tournament

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Over the course of two weeks, UW Athletics will look back on the Badgers' biggest accomplishments during the 2012-13 season.

A trip to Lincoln, Neb., bared fruit for the Wisconsin softball team in 2013, as the Badgers posted a 3-0 record in Bowlin Stadium en route to their first ever Big Ten tournament title. 

Wisconsin posted a school record 16-7 Big Ten record, earning them the fourth seed in the league's first tournament since 2008. 

Opening action against fifth seeded Northwestern, the Badgers earned a 3-0 victory to advance to the semifinals where they were tasked with the job of defeating the league's regular season champion, No. 6 Michigan. 

With the odds against them, the Badgers knocked off the No. 1 seeded Wolverines for the first time since 2002. A six-run first inning was topped off by a pinch hit grand slam by Steffani LaJeunesse and Cassandra Darrah went the distance on the mound in the 9-3 victory. The win propelled the Badgers to the title game against Minnesota, setting up a rematch of sorts. 

The Gophers earned the series win over the Badgers on April 6-7, despite a no-hitter from senior Meghan McIntosh. Pitching in her third-straight game, Darrah took matters into her own hands, holding Minnesota to just two hits. Wisconsin's offense continued to impress, scoring nine runs on seven hits. 

The victory marked the fourth-seeded Badgers' first Big Ten tournament championship and secured the conference's automatic berth to the NCAA tournament, their first appearance in the national event since 2005 and fourth in program history.

Darrah was named the Big Ten tournament's Most Outstanding player after posting a 3-0 record and pitching all 21.0 innings over the tournament. Darrah, together with LaJeunesse and Maria Van Abel, was named to the 2013 Big Ten All-Tournament team.

Wisconsin softball coach Yvette Healy can measure how far her program has grown by merely taking an inventory on the number of players the Badgers have put on All-Big Ten teams.

In 2010, her first season, Healy had three on the third team: Letty Olivarez, Jennifer Krueger and Shannel Blackshear. It was the most since the UW had four players on the third team in 2005.

In 2011, Karla Powell became only the third player in school history - the first since 2002 - to be named first-team All-Big Ten. Mary Massei was on the second team and Krueger the third team.

 This season, the Badgers had three players recognized on the first team: Massei, Cassandra Darrah and Whitney Massey. Kendall Grimm and Meghan McIntosh were honored on the second team.

"It's huge," Healy said of the progress that has been made in this area. "You want, of course, to get national attention and have All-Americans in the program. But this is the stepping stone.

"You've got to be able to do it within the conference first. When we took over a few years ago, we talked about how many first-team all-conference players there were in the history of the program.

"They had two."

The next step is the most challenging - garnering All-American recognition.

"What you do down the stretch will have a lot to do with it," said Healy, a two-time All-American at DePaul during her playing days. "I think we have players who will at least get a look.

"When you get to this win-or-go-home postseason-type of play, you have to be able to perform against the best teams when it counts the most. The most important games are the games to come."

The best marketing tool is performance, especially on the bigger stages, like this weekend's Big Ten tournament in Lincoln, Neb. The Badgers earned a first-round bye and open play on Friday.

If nothing else, they won't need a GPS to find Bowlin Stadium.

Wisconsin has played three games there in each of the last two seasons.

In 2012, the Badgers upset Nebraska, 3-1, in the series opener; snapping a 16-game home winning streak for the Huskers. Darrah allowed just six hits.

In mid-April, Darrah again limited Nebraska to six hits and only two runs and received even more offensive support from her teammates. The Badgers won 5-2 on the strength of a four-run sixth inning.

The fact that Wisconsin has won at least one game on each of its last two trips to Lincoln is something that Healy is hoping to build on and it starts with the pitching, Darrah and McIntosh.

"We're thrilled Cassandra got first-team all-conference,' Healy said. "But she still has a long ways to go to become the player that she has the ability to be.

"To have nine wins in the conference is a big deal and to win at Nebraska last year and this year just shows that she's had some really clutch Big Ten wins for us."

Can there be any application of muscle memory for Darrah? "We hope," Healy said. "There are not many pitchers who can say they know what it's like to win at Nebraska."

McIntosh struggled against Michigan State but Healy is counting on her resiliency.

"We do expect her to bounce back," she said. "She's got a bunch of big wins, especially in conference. To throw a no-hitter against Minnesota at their place shows what kind of pitcher she is."

Having thrown a no-hitter earlier in the season, McIntosh joined Andrea Kirchberg as the only pitchers in program history with two no-hitters to their credit. Darrah also had a no-hitter this spring.

Healy believes Massey, a converted infielder-outfielder, deserves some of the credit not only for making a seamless transition this season to catcher, but in managing the pitchers.

"When you catch three no-hitters in one season, you're doing something right behind the plate," Healy said. "She gets a lot of calls for the pitchers by doing a great job of framing (pitches).

"She also brings a real calming nature to the pitchers. She kind of sets the tempo and keeps them under control and that has given them more confidence in throwing to her."

The lack of postseason experience is obviously a concern for Healy. "A lot of the Big Ten teams have players who have played in the NCAA tournament and won," she said.

That the Badgers drew a record crowd (2,007) to Goodman Diamond for last Sunday's doubleheader split against Michigan State was a "great warm-up" for the Big Ten tournament, she said.

"We didn't play as well as we would have liked, we didn't deliver," Healy admitted. "But at least we got experience playing in that atmosphere under our belt and we're hoping to improve on it."

Healy isn't sure what it will take to make the NCAA tournament. "We've done everything we can to put ourselves in a great position," she said. "The last RPI came out and we were still 26.

"I like where we're at."

Especially since Lincoln has become such a home away from home.

Regular season finale

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In today's Badger Blog, head coach Yvette Healy writes about the end of the regular season and the impressive season in the Big Ten. 

We're gearing up for the last weekend of regular season play in Madison. Wisconsin is 38-9 and our 15-5 record in conference has us sitting in second place in the Big Ten! 

We host Michigan State this weekend for a big three-game series. What Badgers fan doesn't love battling the Spartans? Friday's 6 p.m. game will be broadcast on the Big Ten Network, and there are a ton of fun activities all weekend. 

It's crazy to realize that this is only our second weekend at home this season; we've played 40 games on the road this spring. We can't wait to play in front of our family and friends, as we celebrate senior day for Maggie, Molly, Shannel, Kendall, Kelsey, Meghan and Whitney. 

Three Big Ten teams have a chance to earn the Big Ten championship in the final weekend of Big Ten play, with Michigan (17-2), Wisconsin (15-5) and Nebraska (14-5) vying for the conference crown. 

The Big Ten is one of three conferences, joining the SEC and Pac-12, with six or more teams in the top 50 of the latest RPI. Nebraska (sixth) climbed four spots this week, while Michigan (12th), Wisconsin (23rd), Minnesota (29th), Iowa (34th) and Northwestern (45th) are also among the top 50.

When you think about the amazing winning legacies that Michigan and Nebraska have built, it's impressive just to be mentioned in the same sentence as these powerhouse programs. They've combined for 16 world series appearances, and more than 30 conference championships. We know the Badgers softball program will grow and improve by osmosis and proximity, just being around and near great coaches like Carol Hutchins and Rhonda Revelle and their Huskers and Wolverines legacies in the Big Ten.

Mental toughness, leadership and faith

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In today's blog, head coach Yvette Healy writes about mental toughness, leadership and most importantly, faith. 

The thought for today is faith. When you're trying to build a program into having a national presence, the trip is long and arduous. It's no easy path year to year, and within each season. The fact is we've never had an all-American in our program. We lack that legacy, that winning tradition that so many of our opponents have. When you're building a new winning tradition, it's so easy to get impatient. Yet throughout the season, you're still in the journey. Even when you play well early in the year, you're just making strides, you haven't arrived yet. 

The toughest test of mental toughness and fortitude is faith. Can you get your team and staff to truly believe in a future that they have never seen? Can you get recruits and parents to buy into a vision that is yet to exist?

We are so proud of this team, and this group of young women forging the way, battling to be a Top-25 team. Yet when you're on the road for your first 30 games, you're facing adversity and challenges more extreme than your counterparts. You're in a truly challenging situation trying to create something, when the odds are stacked against you. 

This group is fighting the good fight, playing hard, and earning every step of progress we achieve. 

Today will be a great test of mental toughness, leadership and faith. 

Minnesota memories

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Keri McGee  #5, 2B
Years Lettered: 1996-1999
Hometown: San Jose, CA

Honestly, my biggest memory of Minnesota was that it was the first place our first team in 1995 ever played! It was fall ball and it was probably the coldest day in history of UW softball... and all we had were shorts! Regardless of the weather or our uniforms, it is one of my fondest memories because it was when we really started to feel like a team. We were all in it together and definitely started creating memories that very first weekend in Minnesota Good luck to the Badgers this weekend - keep up the great season!

Amanda Berg   #24, 1B/C
Years Lettered: 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000
Hometown: Chippewa Falls, WI

I completely second Keri's comments... it was the first away game of the program's career -- that is where it started -- the score was so horrible that day that I vowed to never let that happen again to our border rival or anyone else. We realized that we had a long way to go but we were beginning something special for our school and for many women who would come after us. When you look at the pictures from that day, you will see many smiles on our faces, not because we won but because we realized what we had just begun. From then on, we continued to battle with them and even started winning the rivalry. It had to start somewhere and we may have lost that day, but the program continues almost 20 years later! Best of luck today ladies and I can't wait to read about the wins! You are making all of us alumni proud this season and we hope it continues right into a Big Ten championship and a berth to the NCAA tournament! And just be thankful you don't have to play in shorts in 30 degree weather...vour legs were so pink that day it looked like we were wearing red pants!

Athena Vasquez   #24, INF
Years Lettered: 2004-2007
Hometown: Costa Mesa, CA

I have a painful memory against the Gophers. Three cracked ribs after colliding with a runner for a force out and almost missing the Big Ten tournament back in 2005. 

If I could, here's some wisdom for each game, possibly reiterating coach Healy: One pitch, one out, one inning at a time. All your training in the off season prepared you for these coming weeks, so relax. Your muscle memory will take over.

Focus on what you can control. Be aware of your stress level. Remember to approach each inning fresh, use your positive self talk and encourage your teammates with positive affirmations. Keep each other calm and confident. 

Have fun Badgers!! 

Karla Powell  #32, 1B/DP
Years Lettered: 2009-2012
Hometown: Ashburn, VA

I remember my freshman year we played home against Minnesota.  I was up in the bottom of the 7th with two outs and Jen Krueger was on third base.  I hit the ball to the first baseman and it hit off her glove and as the second baseman grabbed the ball and was diving for first. I also dove into first and was called safe and won the game. It was one of the greatest memories playing at Goodman Diamond.

Dana Rasmussen  #10, C/UT
Years Lettered: 2008-2011
Hometown: Madison, WI

My sophomore year. We beat them the last game of the season with a walk off. With two outs, Karla Powell hit a ball to the first baseman, who booted it (not a hard shot, mind you). Karla dove into first base head first and was safe, scoring the winning run. Even though that was only our 15th win of the season and there were absolutely NO hopes of a tournament, it seriously felt like we just won the World Series.

That won't happen this season because these girls are doing great. So proud of all of them!

ON WISCONSIN